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20121031
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year with irene. we thought it was going to be such a big event for new york and it was a dud. it wasn't a big dud for vermont, new hampshire, new jersey, because of the flooding. but this is what we have to work through right now. this storm that looks like that, like just literally nothing, still a small category 1 hurricane, but can this morph literally into something that will have 80 to 90 mile per hour winds, put 20 inches of rain down, and cause millions of people to be without power for days and probably some for weeks. can it happen? yes. all the forecasts say that it will happen. but you know what, all the forecasts said that irene would be a worse storm than it was and it's not. everyone i'm talking to believes that this storm will be significantly more impact for new york, new jersey, maybe pennsylvania than irene was. >> it's going to be a tropical storm, right, by the time it gets up, by the time it actually hits the eastern seaboard? >> no, it will be a tropical storm briefly in here. here's the model guidance for you. the models are all right there. we put them into mot
learned from last year's hurricane irene. here's the local mayor. all right, well, we talked to the local mayor earlier and they are prepared under 24-hour operations here trying to keep the lines of communication open with residents here who chose not to evacuate as well as keeping up-to-date with everything going on in terms of emergency responses and any type of damage that may come because of hurricane sandy, don and chad. >> sandy, standby. we have chad myers here again. sandy, you can play along in this as well. so we have sandra, chad is in ocean city, maryland, 200 miles north of georgia. georgia is getting pelted at this point. how long before sandy starts to feel what he's feeling? >> there are arms on this storm. they are almost like you see a picture of the hurricane with spiral bands. that's what we have with the storm. let me walk over here to describe what you're going to look at for the next 36 hours. i want you to know when you see it what you're seeing. there's the center of the storm right there, don. wherever there's color, that's where it is storming. that's where it
seen it. worse than irene. this is a frustrating situation to him. it has all to do with underground infrastructure. i shouldn't say only because that would be a record breaking storm surge. we had one that was higher than that. that's the main reason that it will take so long. >> some of those areas deliberately shut down power out of precaution. explain what happened. >> it is convenient because you don't have wires aboveground. but during a flooding situation that can spell big problems and it did. so they will shut down some of the stations as a precautionary measure and saeal them off so they don't get the corrosive salt water in there. they judged it on the past historic storms and built it higher than that. that's exactly what sandy brought them. so an unprecedented event and something that really they didn't plan for. i asked them are you going to look into upgrading that? that would cost serious dollars but he did acknowledge, that's a question that certainly has to be discussed. >> i know you have spoken with a lot of new yorkers. how are they reacting? especially the lower
is that we kind of had those same warnings for irene. i don't want people to go, oh, they just say that all the time just to get our attention. but, no, there is potential for some dire stuff going on here. and we're talking about power down -- power lines down, trees down, all kinds of other things. finally the computers are agreeing. and you can see a couple doing loops. if this thing does a loop right over new york or new jersey or pennsylvania, that means 24 to 36 hours of rain coming down an inch in an hour. do the math. that's a couple feet of potential water. here we go. the potential impacts, i think the coastal infland flooding the biggest. obviously we saw that in vermont from irene. the waves will be larger than 30 feet battering long island, new rhode island all the way to massachusetts and new jersey depending on where it lands. coastal erosion. we could lose homes as the beach gets washed away and power outages could be in the millions taking literally maybe a week to get all those power lines back up. and that could be far enough that it could affect the election. wolf. >> br
hurricane irene, we achieved a 98% evacuation rate. but for whatever reason, this time, we haven't reached that number yet. we think we're somewhere having evacuated several thousand people. but we still have too many people in atlantic city. that creates a very uncomfortable situation for all of our emergency responders and officials are still trying to do the best we can to get people out of harm's way. >> mayor, ali velshi is on the streets of atlantic city. right now, the winds are obviously very gusty. ali, you have a question you'd like to ask the mayor. >> reporter: yes, i do, mayor. and the important thing is by looking at atlantic city, people can look at this and say, this might happen in my community. if you're still not evacuated, what do you do? i know people are driving around. they can get out in their car but it's gusty and dangerous. should people leave and go to a shelter now or hunker down and stay? >> at this point, i think they would be best served to stay at home and hunker down. i just visited a couple of our shelters. i had a very difficult time getting back to wher
because our viewers may remember this incident. it's from hurricane irene. the coast guard and fire and rescue teams had to swim out into the rough, into the rough water to rescue a couple who had lived on their boat. how is the koebs guacoast guardg for search and rescue missions during sandy? continue. >> you know, certainly your coast guard is ready all the time to do those cases. first thing, of course, is preparation. we tell the public, it's time to stay away. we try to minimize folks that are storm chasers or sightseers in heavy weather. standing on the rocks, going out on the rip rap of a break water is not a safe place to be. it's time to be prudent when you're around the water. the winds and the seas are unpredictable and you need to stay ashore. >> at this point, i asked general russel honore the same thing, i only have about 20 seconds if you can answer, are we making the right decisions here and do you think people are heeding the warnings? >> yes, i think so. we've been working this since the middle of last week. with flights offshore, warning ships offshore. they've d
irene last year. we don't want that. >> you are talking about a storm doing all of this at category 1 possibly. could it get bigger? probably doesn't get bigger. could be a small category 2. the issue is not so much it's a category 1 because it spins around and stays for a long time. there's a big high pressure ridge to the west of it. you have high pressure on one side and even a small low pressure on the other, you get a lot of wind, but we have a big low pressure and a big high pressure, so wind away from this storm. 200 miles away from the center of sandy. could have winds of 80 to 90 miles an hour. that's tremendous. that's a widespread swath of damage. >> and do you think it could affect early voting? from what you're describing, yes, right? >> i don't see how it doesn't affect early voting. we are going to have hundreds of thousands if not millions of people without power. can't get all those powerlines back up at once. it may take until wednesday or thursday to get that power back up. we're going to have coastal erosion. a million trees down from all this wind and it's widespr
for a very long time because of a storm and it was just last year with hurricane irene that brought a lot of power outages for a very lengthy time to the state of connecticut. >> that's right, i would contrast this storm from the deratio we experienced this summer, where it same upon us all at once, we didn't have the time to stage our crews. this time we have several days warning, we're staging our crews, but again, this is going to be a very, very severe storm. mr. owens, meteorologist chad myers has a question for you. >> this is going to be one of those big storms, it's going to be windy for a long time and people are going to lose power at the beginning and are going to be very impatient in the beginning, and you won't put crews out there until what purpose? you're obviously not going to put men in bucks at 60? >> yes, we'll wait until the wind dies down. so obviously, we're only going to have those crews seek to restore service. you first have to assess the damage and we believe that there will be substantial physical destruction of our infrastructure, we're going to have to assess
. just a year ago we had the irene experience. fairly significant amount of time from time to time. people are used to weather events. not used to hurricanes but a weather event nonetheless and it's here, dangerous, and people are taking it seriously. the public is taking it seriously. the citizens of the city have heeded the warnings. we've gotten through some of the toughest part of this. we'll still get hit tonight and overnight with the actual storm, high wind that will weaken trees. we have 90 to 100 trees down. 400 thousand people without power in the region and our energy company will do a fantastic job getting those people back on. on the one hand, you hope for the best, prepare for the worst. we have a great professional team making sure philadelphiaens are safe. >> sounds like first responders all over the northeast should get a big shout out. they've done an amazing job. >> absolutely. >> mr. mayor, thank you for joining me. >> piers, thank you. bye-bye. >> coming up next, storm chaser taking on super storm sandy. [ male announcer ] citi turns 200 this year. in that time
in new york harbor right now, a half a foot higher than hurricane irene. when the high tide starts to flood in late this afternoon, early this evening, we'll see record-breaking surge hikes. >> does that mean water goes in the subway? >> probably. >> probably. >> i don't know what kind of sandbagging efforts that they're going to be having in place. i mean, since irene, i know they've taken some steps to see if they can get some sort of better protection from subway entrances, but the official forecast is calling for a 10 hfgs to 12-foot storm tide and it only needs to be 10.5 feet to flood the subway. >> jeff, we've seen the pictures. we keep hearing the adjectives colossal, gigantic, to describe it. almost in november, cold in the north. how does a storm like this size form? >> well, it started in the caribbean, which it's always warm enough year around to make hurricanes form. and once it got north of the caribbean it found itself right over the gulf stream, at least over the past day or so, and it was in a very unique spot, right over an axis of the warm gulf stream waters that
's see. katrina -- or irene last year this area also flooded. but not nearly as bad as this. the clean up, it's pretty much drained within a day or so. and lost no electricity last year. this one we were -- you know, we don't know the epa. >> reporter: dan, thanks very much. good luck to you. wolf, there's one resident, one business owner here determine today recover. others here have an amazing sense of community spirit. these are all community volunteers doing all this work largely responsible for the clearing of the streets. as i mentioned, just a couple hours ago this water was up to my knees, up to the knees of these volunteers who waded out here in some very, very unhealthy and almost dangerous water because it has so much sewage and chemicals and garbage in it. >> brian, we'll get back to you in hoboken, new jersey. let's head back to manhattan. we've re-established our contact with dr. sanjay gupta. he's at bellevue hospital, sanjay, 700 patients now need to be evacuated because they've lost power, emergency generators at bellevue hospital? >> yeah. i think that's the best way of
, connecticut, long island, new jersey, than irene did last year. this could be a big storm as it makes that turn and slams directly into where new york and new jersey come together, the water could really pile up in here. maybe that problem we thought about last time where water's in the subway, if it gets to be right in new york harbor, we're talking about that scenario potential again. >> chad, we'll keep watching. thanks. >>> a lot more we're following. isha is here with the bulletin. >>> a new york city police officer accused of plotting to kidnap, rape, kill, cook and cannibalize as many as 100 women is being held without bail. the 28-year-old officer is accused of illegally accessing a national crime database to locate potential targets. he did not enter a plea in court today. >>> lee boyd malveaux told the "today" show he was sexually abused by john alan mohammed, the master will did mind mind o attacks that terrorized the washington area in 2002, saying he knew it was wrong but didn't have the willpower to say no. he was 17 at the time of the attacks and he was 15 when his acco
irene did last year. this could be a big storm as it makes that turn and slams directly into where new york and new jersey come together, the water could really pile up in here. maybe that problem we thought about last time where water's in the subway, if it gets to be right in new york harbor, we're talking about that scenario potential again. >> chad, we'll keep watching. thanks. >>> a lot more we're following. isha is here with the bulletin. >>> a late breaking story. a top romney surrogate tonight 50 tributing colin powell's endorsement of president obama to race. here is what john sununu said moments ago on "piers morgan tonight." >> frankly, when you take a look at colin powell, you have to wonder whether that's an endorsement based on issues or whether he has a slightly different reason for preferring president obama. >> what reason would that be? >> well, when you have somebody of your own race that you're proud of for being of your own race, i applaud colin powell for doing so. >>> there wasn't enough real time information to determine exactly what was happening in benghazi, l
know, when we had irene come through last year, it was -- we were preparing for a category 1 plus storm. we ordered mandatory evacuation, we shut down the subway system. the bridges, some of them were shut down when the winds kicked up. that was a hurricane and that storm came through very quickly and we were able to get through it quickly. this has now turned into a nor'easter. it was a hurricane, went to a t tropical storm, now has gone down to a nor'easter. still huge in size. these are things that we're seeing. there's a lot more -- lot of what we're seeing is more violent. we are seeing more tornadoes. it's unusual but it's the second time we ordered mandatory evacuation, probably only two times in the history of the city that's been done. since i've been here. overall, i think we got to do the things that are necessary to tell the public that this is a serious matter. we want them to be safe. >> thank you very much, joseph bruno. i'll just add to that, i have never seen manhattan like this. as i said, all the neighborhood stores are closed and the starbucks are closed. everything
with katrina and irene and so on, you look to see how individual governors and states and indeed, the federal level, have coped with this. from what you're seeing, what you're hearing and picking up, are you impressed with the preparation? are you concerned still? >> i mean, this is the first disaster i've gone through in new york city and i mean, just as a resident of the city, it seems pretty well run. i think there's always going to be things that happen and you just can't keep the ocean out of your city if the ocean's determined to get in. >> i think mayor bloomberg has been spot-on, actually. he's done a series of press conferences. he seems to be completely on top of the brief. he's prepared everybody. there's always going to be, i can't believe this, still idiots who are out there today jogging next to the water. why would you be so stupid? listen to what the mayors, the governors, president, everyone is telling you, get inside and be safe. >> i think curiosity is an incredibly powerful force. we can watch the news on tv but sometimes it's right down the street and it's very hard not t
in white plains, where literally trees are ripped from its roots. >> amazing stuff. first, irene, now sandy. for two consecutive years, costly deadly hurricanes hit the northeast. we're hear a lot of people say if irene was a wake-up call, sandy is a bucket of water that should snap us all to attention. let's listen to andrew cuomo, the governor of new york. >> there has been a series of extreme weather incidents. anyone that is not a political statement, that is not a factual statement. anyone who says there is not a dramatic change in weather patterns, i think is denying reality. and i would like to say that this is probably the last occurrence we will have. i don't believe that. >> cuomo went on to say new york now seems to get a 100 year flood every two years. joining me now is ben strauss, the chief operating officer and director of the program on sea level rise at climate central. is this a sign of things to come? governor cuomo is saying we seem to be getting 100-year storm every two years. >> this was actually -- since 1900, three of the top ten highest flood levels have occurred in
, would be more dangerous than even irene from last year. it turned out to be a huge flood problem for virginia, vermont and new jersey. i know it's late in the season, but the water is still warm enough to make this storm generate. it went -- i was watch it last night in bed on my -- i was tweeting from 8:00 until 12:00, and this thing went from an 80-mile-per-hour storm to about a 115 as it left jamaica and slammed into cuba, and that was only in five hours. there's a lot of potential. >> is it true that a late storm as well could be a lot deadlier, a lot more dangerous late in the season? >> i would say an earlier storm, october 10th, that peak day with the waters the warmest would be the most concerning, but i think people probably take it less serious. oh, come on, it's november. it can't happen. there's not going to be anything bad. if you let your guard down and think that it's out of season, you're wrong. look at the waves there. is that miami? somewhere. look at that. the way it's crashing on. that's why you can't even be on the sea wall. you need to be behind it and in th
irene of last year. >> okay. we'll talk about it for a little while. thank you very much. >>> now back to politics. forget ohio and florida for a second here. the campaigns turning to virginia which president obama turned blue last go around but this time there are cracks in his support. john king talks with voters on the ground amid a dead heat in the polls. rees all laugh when you walk by ♪ ♪ and the neighbors' kids... what does being true to yourself have to do with being healthy? everything. ♪ but you're not ♪ you're the one ♪ one, one, one, one, one ♪ the one ♪ one, one, one, one, one ♪ the one ♪ one, one, one... email marketing from constant contact reaches people in a place they're checking every day -- their inbox. and it gives you the tools to create custom emails that drive business. it's just one of the ways constant contact can help you grow your small business. sign up for your free trial today at constantcontact.com/try. >>> virginia will be inundated with presidential campaign stops really between now and sunday. president obama and paul ryan today. joe
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)

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